Category Archives: commuting

Free Hotdogs for ASU Cyclists

Today on the Tempe campus at ASU, volunteers were giving out free hotdogs and t-shirts to students who commute by bike or use public transportation. I was lucky enough to ride right by the tent where this was all going down! If you are near the MU, look for this gold and maroon ASU tent and a line of people waiting for hotdogs.

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I dismounted my bike and a volunteer handed me a t-shirt and a menu for Dave’s Doghouse to redeem a free hotdog. They even added a healthy squirt of ketchup and some relish- my favorite toppings! It was delicious.

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Cyclists were encouraged to register their bike with ASU and given any information they needed about cycling on campus. It’s smart to register your bike so you have documentation proving that the bike is yours- just in case!

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Biking On Campus

Two weeks of the fall semester is underway and I’ve seen tons of students commuting by bike around the Tempe campus. It just warms my heart! Or maybe it’s the fact the temperature is still lingering in the three digit temperatures and probably will be for quite awhile still to come.

But anyways, it’s good to see lots of students on bikes. So many actually- I sometimes can’t find a bike rack with an empty spot on the Tempe campus. Maybe it’s when I’m on campus that is just really busy or possibly more and more people are making the choice to ride a bike for transportation.

One morning last week, I rode around for awhile looking for a spot to park my ride. I finally found an open spot and locked it up with two locks: a thick cable woven through my tires and a Kryptonite U-lock to seal the deal. It’s important to secure your bike with two locks in order to discourage bike thieves from tampering with it. Many other students have a method that works for them, but because I have been a victim of theft in the past, I now take these precautions. I even saw some bikes leaning on their kickstand and locked with a U-lock through a tire to prevent the bike from moving. As this technique can probably work, it does leave many other parts susceptible to be broken off or stolen. I am no expert, but just stating an unintended possibility of locking a bike this way- especially in a town that is known for bike theft.

My bike suffered a minor issue today, as when I unlocked the bike I noticed my chain had popped off. I normally don’t like to get very dirty, but I knew my bike was an important element in getting me from place to place for the remainder of the day. So I manned up and stretched out the greasy chain until I thought it was back in place. Hooray! I actually fixed something! Or so I thought….until I began to ride. The chain was moving alright, but it was making all kinds of clinking sounds that continued even after switching gears back and forth. At least I made it to my next class. I guess I’ll deal with it later.

So as soon as class let out, I unlocked my bike and rode it clink-clinking my way to the other end of campus and paid the guys at the Bike Co-op a visit. They were pretty busy today, so I guess others were having bike issues, also.

Luckily the chain was an easy fix for the bike experts on campus. They saved the day and sent me on my way to my next class. Thanks a bunch!

It’s a Hard Bike Life for Me

It always amazes me how the mind of a bike thief works. My bike means so much more to me than it will to the thief for the part they stole. For the last three months, I have used my bike to get everywhere- to work, the store, to meet a friend for a drink- simply because I can’t afford to fix my car. I actually am starting to enjoy commuting by bike- I save lots of money on gas, get some exercise and don’t add more pollutants to the air. Luckily, most places I need to go aren’t too far away. The reason I purchased a bike a few years ago was to make getting around Tempe much easier and it’s been wonderful! But nothing seems to stop a bike thief. They are out looking for an opportunity. As much as I think I take precautions to avoid this, I’m not as careful as I should be. I guess I thought it wasn’t really fair to spend extra time whenever I need to lock it up to make sure all parts are secure and double locked. But even so, my bike has been the victim of theft many times on the Tempe campus or light rail stations, but also now in front of my own apartment. This time it was my seat that went missing, which makes a bike ride very uncomfortable. I also noticed that my cup holder was cut, not missing, but only tampered with. It just gets so very discouraging! I don’t really want to buy anything cute or expensive for my bike to make it stand out to a thief or anyone else walking by my bike.

But I guess when parking my bike at home, I should just carry the bike up to my third floor apartment to minimize theft risk to almost zero. I can handle a little more exercise! Plus it’s worth the feeling of insurance that my bike will be there when I need to get to work or school in the morning.

I sort of wish there were bike theft detectives to help with this problem because police really are too busy to worry about this and have a very low recovery rate for stolen bikes and probably also for parts. Tempe is one of the worst cities for bike theft. I don’t even have to look it up! (See my video¬†interview with the Sgt. Stewart, Tempe police officer.)

So I’m back at the tireless circle of what prompted me to start this blog- theft. Ugggh! What’s a cyclist to do? It’s sad to say but nothing more than vent and take more action against bike theft in the future.

Too Busy Riding Around On My Bike

I know that I haven’t produced a particularly entertaining blog in some time. I’m really sorry about that! It’s a shame because there have been so many bike events going on in Tempe in April! After all we’ve had the most lovely weather that one could dream of for a bike ride! (I highly recommend Tempe Town Lake for a breezy ride during sunset- beautiful!) If you have attended any bike events recently please feel free to drop me a line about your experience at the event or even a photo. Whatever you want to share!

So here’s my excuse, I’ve been super busy with classes, a PR internship and even hiking when I really need to get out, but the important thing for my readers to know is that, where ever I may be, I most likely rode my bike there! Throughout the last few semesters at school, my car has been unreliable and I mostly use my bike on the daily! Think of all the gas money I have saved! (Although I’m still paying car insurance!?) I’ve taken my bike on the light rail many times and that is always an adventure. It’s difficult because my bike is about medium weight, which is too heavy for Lizzle to lift onto the little rack on the train. Sad face ūüė¶

Anyways, I usually upload photos to Twitter and sometimes to this blog, when my iPhone app is working correctly! If you want to keep up with me and my travels on bike, make sure to follow @twowheelintempe and @lizzlemynizzle. I also made up the hashtag is #GoRideABike and it’d be cool with me if you borrow that from time to time!

Happy Biking!

Time For Another ‘That Bike On The Street’

I’ve seen another bike in passing that caught my eye! This bike is a lime green Cannondale road bike. I love the white racing handlebars. I saw this bike near ASU’s Tempe campus on College Avenue and Sixth Street. It’s a neat bike, but also pretty expensive.

What is your favorite brand of bike? I currently have a Schwinn hybrid that fits my lifestyle quite nicely!

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Minutes From the Tweed Ride

Speeding my bike along the lake was the perfect way to commute to the Tweed Ride on Saturday evening at Tempe Town Lake.

When I arrived I saw a group of well dressed lads with their bikes near the entrance of the park.

Where did you buy your tweed?

The weather had been warm all day, but at the 5:30 p.m. meeting time, the breeze was just right for wearing tweed!

People gathered with their bikes for photos taken by Ryan Guzy, of Tempe Bicycle Action Group. We know the bike activist group in Tempe, as T.B.A.G.

Finally the ride began!

Someone bellowed, “Off to Robbie Fox’s Public House!”

(Remember to practice bicycle safety and use a bike light or two after dark.)

A line of cyclists took off down Mill Avenue towards the first destination.

The group chimed bells throughout the ride signaling we were on our way.

At a stop light, near Mill Avenue and Fourth Street a man in a large white truck asked about the bike group. Someone quickly explained about T.B.A.G. The man nodded as he told us to “be careful”!

Robbie Fox’s had a few tables on the patio reserved for the crew. We all locked up bikes behind the patio.

Plaid looks good on you!

The next stop was Canteen Modern Tequila Bar, which did not require a ride- just a short walk, as it neighbors Robbie Fox’s.

I sat at the bar for a quick shot of pineapple infused tequila, which was recommended by the bartender.

The group enjoyed a cocktail or beer while chatting and getting to know the newcomers.

After a few drinks and socializing, prizes were awarded for the best dressed and other categories.

Then the signal was given to move on to the next location, Casey Moore’s Oyster House.

Sampling from the beer selection

The sun went down and everyone needed to use bike lights and attach extra reflectors. While crossing the street, one cyclist pointed out an instance when bikers should wait for a car speeding by.

Once the crew had all showed up at Casey Moore’s, Ryan took a group shot. Although it was difficult to see in the dark, he did a great job!

The Tweed Crew

Other bars on the map were Yucca Tap Room and Boulders on Broadway.

Upcoming bike ride:

Excuse me. I must asche you a question.

Photos by: Lauren Fach and Ryan Guzy

Afraid of the dark? A bike light will save you!

One law that all cyclists should know is to use a light when riding at night. This is for your safety as a biker- to help others see you.

When I first bought my bike, the salesman at Earnhardt Schwinn recommended that I buy a bike light. Thinking he was just trying to sell me add-on items I said no and told him that I wasn’t planning on riding at night. It was true, I hadn’t been biking in years and didn’t feel confident enough to go for a night bike ride. Well I stayed at the library studying too late one night and I eventually needed a bike light.

The next day I went to Tempe Bicycle to buy a light. They range in price from about $12 to $20 depending on the quality and style. Some can be easily removed and others can be fixed to your bike. Beware if left on your bike, the light could be stolen. I find that most people will leave your bike alone, but if no one is around the bike rack- some people will help themselves to objects that can be removed quickly like bike lights, horns, tires and seats. It’s true, it’s happened to me!

Here are some cool bike lights.

Planet Bike Rear(red) and Front(white) Light

Alternative ways to light your ride:

A bike light is not the only answer to riding safely at night. Here are a few options to help with visibility.

Reflective stickers – $6, LED Bicycle Lights- $50 and a headlamp ranges from about $20-$40.


Just be careful out there and use your head! Cycling is fun and is a great form of transportation, whether it’s day or night. But make sure you have a bike light!