Register Your Bike With ASU!

If you ride your bike to campus, you have probably seen many other students cycling to class, as well. Because ASU is a haven for students on bikes, unfortunately it’s also a bike thieves’ playground.

In other blog posts, I have recommended ways to protect your bike from theft, but a simple way to document that your bike belongs to you – is to register it with ASU. It only takes a few minutes to enter your bike’s information and ensures you have proof that your bike is yours!

To register your bike with ASU:

  1. Visit https://cfo.asu.edu/bike-regform
  2. Enter your information and bike’s serial number
  3. Upload a photo of your bike
  4. Add any distinguishing features of your bike
  • EXAMPLE: My bike has a pink bell, white basket and a zebra striped seat.

If for some reason you need to report your bike stolen, this information will be very helpful in trying to locate it and get it returned to you. Trying to recall exactly what your bike looked like or the serial number could be difficult after the fact. Help yourself out and register your bike! Good luck cyclists!

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That Bike On The Street Continues…

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I saw this shiny, red road bike locked to a bike rack outside the ED Farmer Building on the ASU Tempe campus today and couldn’t help but snap a quick photo. It stood out to me amongst the variety of bikes I had seen on campus. This red bike’s handlebars are wrapped in white tape, which also matches the seat, for a more custom look. Being that it’s the first day of school, many students are pedaling their newly acquired two wheelers around campus. Be sure to lock up your bike and secure any removable parts to prevent bike theft, which is all too common in Tempe. Got a cool bike? I may see it around town and add your prized possession to a future edition of “That Bike On The Street”! Follow my blog to stay posted and thanks for reading!

It’s a Hard Bike Life for Me

It always amazes me how the mind of a bike thief works. My bike means so much more to me than it will to the thief for the part they stole. For the last three months, I have used my bike to get everywhere- to work, the store, to meet a friend for a drink- simply because I can’t afford to fix my car. I actually am starting to enjoy commuting by bike- I save lots of money on gas, get some exercise and don’t add more pollutants to the air. Luckily, most places I need to go aren’t too far away. The reason I purchased a bike a few years ago was to make getting around Tempe much easier and it’s been wonderful! But nothing seems to stop a bike thief. They are out looking for an opportunity. As much as I think I take precautions to avoid this, I’m not as careful as I should be. I guess I thought it wasn’t really fair to spend extra time whenever I need to lock it up to make sure all parts are secure and double locked. But even so, my bike has been the victim of theft many times on the Tempe campus or light rail stations, but also now in front of my own apartment. This time it was my seat that went missing, which makes a bike ride very uncomfortable. I also noticed that my cup holder was cut, not missing, but only tampered with. It just gets so very discouraging! I don’t really want to buy anything cute or expensive for my bike to make it stand out to a thief or anyone else walking by my bike.

But I guess when parking my bike at home, I should just carry the bike up to my third floor apartment to minimize theft risk to almost zero. I can handle a little more exercise! Plus it’s worth the feeling of insurance that my bike will be there when I need to get to work or school in the morning.

I sort of wish there were bike theft detectives to help with this problem because police really are too busy to worry about this and have a very low recovery rate for stolen bikes and probably also for parts. Tempe is one of the worst cities for bike theft. I don’t even have to look it up! (See my video interview with the Sgt. Stewart, Tempe police officer.)

So I’m back at the tireless circle of what prompted me to start this blog- theft. Ugggh! What’s a cyclist to do? It’s sad to say but nothing more than vent and take more action against bike theft in the future.

Update: Prom Ride is now Vegan Zombie Prom Ride!

This image and content were provided by the Tempe Bicycle Action Group. Check out their Facebook event. http://on.fb.me/KqGbqp

Where: Meet at Tempe Beach Park entrance: the northwest corner of Rio Salado Parkway and Mill Avenue in TempeWhen: Saturday, May 12, 7:30 p.m.Cost: FREE

How: For more information, contact biketempe.org

Wish you could relive the sweaty-palmed dance, the oddly posed photos, the drama and excitement of your first prom? This may not be the prom for you.

This go around, prom will be less about getting a pink blush on your cheeks after your first kiss, and more about keeping your rotting body parts from falling off.

May 12, the Tempe Bicycle Action Group’s Second Saturday ride will be infected by the Vegan Zombie Beer Club in all their undead glory.

Get out that rotting old tux and taffeta dress, and give your maggot-eaten face a shine – the ghouls are hitting the town!

Meet other festively dressed corpses at 7:30 p.m. in Tempe Beach Park, on the northwest corner of Mill Avenue and Rio Salado Parkway. Photographers will be on hand for pics with props and a backdrop for your dead heart to dote on for eternity. Then the ghoulish party will set off on bicycles to the fine drinking establishments of Tempe.

All cyclists are invited. Please RSVP to the Facebook event at the Tempe Bicycle Action Group Facebook page.

Too Busy Riding Around On My Bike

I know that I haven’t produced a particularly entertaining blog in some time. I’m really sorry about that! It’s a shame because there have been so many bike events going on in Tempe in April! After all we’ve had the most lovely weather that one could dream of for a bike ride! (I highly recommend Tempe Town Lake for a breezy ride during sunset- beautiful!) If you have attended any bike events recently please feel free to drop me a line about your experience at the event or even a photo. Whatever you want to share!

So here’s my excuse, I’ve been super busy with classes, a PR internship and even hiking when I really need to get out, but the important thing for my readers to know is that, where ever I may be, I most likely rode my bike there! Throughout the last few semesters at school, my car has been unreliable and I mostly use my bike on the daily! Think of all the gas money I have saved! (Although I’m still paying car insurance!?) I’ve taken my bike on the light rail many times and that is always an adventure. It’s difficult because my bike is about medium weight, which is too heavy for Lizzle to lift onto the little rack on the train. Sad face 😦

Anyways, I usually upload photos to Twitter and sometimes to this blog, when my iPhone app is working correctly! If you want to keep up with me and my travels on bike, make sure to follow @twowheelintempe and @lizzlemynizzle. I also made up the hashtag is #GoRideABike and it’d be cool with me if you borrow that from time to time!

Happy Biking!

Time For Another ‘That Bike On The Street’

I’ve seen another bike in passing that caught my eye! This bike is a lime green Cannondale road bike. I love the white racing handlebars. I saw this bike near ASU’s Tempe campus on College Avenue and Sixth Street. It’s a neat bike, but also pretty expensive.

What is your favorite brand of bike? I currently have a Schwinn hybrid that fits my lifestyle quite nicely!

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The Bike Thief Strikes Again

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Another bike has been stripped of its wheels, seat and chain on the ASU Tempe campus. This bike was selected by one of the many sneaky bike thieves that like to frequent near the ASU campuses. What was once a stylish ride is now the sad remains of a bike frame, that could end up chained to this pole at the Rural & University light rail stop indefinitely. Many disassembled bikes face the same fate, as many bike owners become discouraged and abandon their once prized two-wheelers.

Don’t let this happen to you! Use a sturdy U-lock and a second lock- a thick cable lock to secure quick release wheels. Also, if you see a suspicious person tampering with a bike, call the Tempe Police at 480.350.8311… Or if you feel brave, strike up a conversation with them about the bike in front of them. This should throw the bike thief a curve ball. We, as cyclists, have to be proactive about making our bikes difficult for a thief to steal. It may not be fair, but you’ll be happier riding your bike than wondering how you will get a wheel-less bicycle home!

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